Party vote

Transport and infrastructure

After decades of underspending on transport infrastructure, and with widespread dissatisfaction with the country's urban planning laws, all the parties agree that the way we design our cities and transport systems needs to change. Some say the emphasis should be on making it easier for developers to build, while others say we need a clearer plan for preparing our cities for a changing climate.

Transport and infrastructure

After decades of underspending on transport infrastructure, and with widespread dissatisfaction with the country's urban planning laws, all the parties agree that the way we design our cities and transport systems needs to change. Some say the emphasis should be on making it easier for developers to build, while others say we need a clearer plan for preparing our cities for a changing climate.

Key policiesCars and roadsConstructionEnergyInfrastructure funding and planningInternet and telecommunicationsPublic transport, cycling and walkingRail transportUrban planning and resource management

  • Retain current public transport discounts

    Build a mass rapid transit system in Wellington

    Continue fund for building and upgrading infrastructure

  • Establish a national infrastructure agency

    Reverse water infrastructure reforms

    Reverse resource management reforms

  • Upgrade electricity transmission

    Stop the development of light rail in Auckland

    Abolish the Electricity Authority and establish a Ministry for Energy

  • Provide free public transport to under 30s

    Provide a $1500 credit for bikes and e-scooters to under 30s

    Introduce a card and app for citizens and residents up to the age of 30

  • Abolish the Auckland regional fuel tax

    Require revenue from fuel and road user charges to be reinvested in road infrastructure

    Review all current and planned major infrastructure projects

  • Develop a nationwide rapid rail system for passengers and freight

    Build light rail in Auckland, Wellington and Christchurch

    Prioritise cycle and walking infrastructure over roads

  • Reverse water infrastructure reforms

    Reform resource management laws to reduce restrictions on private property

    Replace fuel taxes with user-pays road pricing

  • Introduce free public transport for all students

    Develop a national Māori strategy for renewable energy and clean technology

    Maintain target of 100% renewable energy by 2030

Key policiesCars and roadsConstructionEnergyInfrastructure funding and planningInternet and telecommunicationsPublic transport, cycling and walkingRail transportUrban planning and resource management

  • Retain current public transport discounts

    Build a mass rapid transit system in Wellington

    Continue fund for building and upgrading infrastructure

  • Establish a national infrastructure agency

    Reverse water infrastructure reforms

    Reverse resource management reforms

  • Upgrade electricity transmission

    Stop the development of light rail in Auckland

    Abolish the Electricity Authority and establish a Ministry for Energy

  • Provide free public transport to under 30s

    Provide a $1500 credit for bikes and e-scooters to under 30s

    Introduce a card and app for citizens and residents up to the age of 30

  • Abolish the Auckland regional fuel tax

    Require revenue from fuel and road user charges to be reinvested in road infrastructure

    Review all current and planned major infrastructure projects

  • Develop a nationwide rapid rail system for passengers and freight

    Build light rail in Auckland, Wellington and Christchurch

    Prioritise cycle and walking infrastructure over roads

  • Reverse water infrastructure reforms

    Reform resource management laws to reduce restrictions on private property

    Replace fuel taxes with user-pays road pricing

  • Introduce free public transport for all students

    Develop a national Māori strategy for renewable energy and clean technology

    Maintain target of 100% renewable energy by 2030

Compare the candidates running in your local area


Each part of the country is represented in Parliament by an electorate MP. We've asked every candidate about their priorities for your community and why they deserve your vote.

Explore