Carterton District Council

The Carterton District Council provides local services and facilities, such as public transport, rubbish and recycling, libraries, parks, and recreation facilities. It also makes decisions about building and planning, local regulations, and infrastructure, such as water supply and sewerage. The council is made up of eight councillors and the mayor. This is a first past the post (FPP) election, so you vote by ticking the name of your preferred candidate on your ballot paper. Compare the candidates and their policies to decide who to vote for in the Carterton District Council election.

Local democracy

Local government is a foundational part of our democracy. But local democracy isn’t just about holding elections every three years – it’s about the day-to-day ways people have their say in the decisions that affect us all.

Local democracy

Local government is a foundational part of our democracy. But local democracy isn’t just about holding elections every three years – it’s about the day-to-day ways people have their say in the decisions that affect us all.

  • Engage with residents more frequently and in a variety of channels.

    Come into a Three Waters reform with a positive mindset instead of negative from the outset.

    Engage with community leaders to ensure fair representation in key decision-making.

  • Ensure all council employees and contractors are on at least the living wage by 2025.

    Examine areas of high staff turnover and see what changes can be made to reduce costs.

    Ensure robust policies are in place to ensure that staff are supported after experiencing bullying, public harassment, or other traumas.

  • Retain our council staff who have the knowledge and expertise.

  • Open decision-making – no more secretive 'advisory' groups which in fact have driven decision-making away from wider scrutiny.

    Innovative engagement, such as Carterton's 'Big Jar of Ideas' balanced with more hard-headed costings and identification of funding sources.

    Clear expectations on priorities and project management from council to the chief executive, to increase efficiency and reduce waste.

  • Refresh local democracy to increase grassroots participation.

    Encourage community engagement at a grassroots level with diverse council representation.

    Ensure that our ratepayers understand that their money is spent wisely through transparency and accountability.

  • Engage with residents more frequently and in a variety of channels.

    Come into a Three Waters reform with a positive mindset instead of negative from the outset.

    Engage with community leaders to ensure fair representation in key decision-making.

  • Ensure all council employees and contractors are on at least the living wage by 2025.

    Examine areas of high staff turnover and see what changes can be made to reduce costs.

    Ensure robust policies are in place to ensure that staff are supported after experiencing bullying, public harassment, or other traumas.

  • Retain our council staff who have the knowledge and expertise.

  • Open decision-making – no more secretive 'advisory' groups which in fact have driven decision-making away from wider scrutiny.

    Innovative engagement, such as Carterton's 'Big Jar of Ideas' balanced with more hard-headed costings and identification of funding sources.

    Clear expectations on priorities and project management from council to the chief executive, to increase efficiency and reduce waste.

  • Refresh local democracy to increase grassroots participation.

    Encourage community engagement at a grassroots level with diverse council representation.

    Ensure that our ratepayers understand that their money is spent wisely through transparency and accountability.