Greater Wellington Regional Council

Pōneke/Wellington Constituency
The Greater Wellington Regional Council makes decisions about managing resources in the region, such as air, water, soil and the coastline. It also carries out plant and pest control, helps prepare for natural disasters, and is involved in regional transport. The council is made up of 13 councillors. Councillors are elected to represent constituencies (areas in the region). Five councillors will be elected from the Pōneke/Wellington constituency. This is a single transferable vote (STV) election, so you vote by ranking the candidates on your ballot paper. Compare the candidates and their policies to decide who to vote for in the Greater Wellington Regional Council election.

Utilities and services

Councils are responsible for a wide range of utilities and services that we all rely on, from rubbish and recycling to street cleaning. Councils are currently also responsible for managing waste water, storm water and drinking water infrastructure – the ‘Three Waters’. But that may be about to change, with central government seeking to shift the delivery of Three Waters services to four new larger entities, which could borrow enough to upgrade the country’s water infrastructure.

Utilities and services

Councils are responsible for a wide range of utilities and services that we all rely on, from rubbish and recycling to street cleaning. Councils are currently also responsible for managing waste water, storm water and drinking water infrastructure – the ‘Three Waters’. But that may be about to change, with central government seeking to shift the delivery of Three Waters services to four new larger entities, which could borrow enough to upgrade the country’s water infrastructure.

  • Support regional council carrying out due diligence in its role transferring essential water infrastructure assets to the National Transfer Unit.

  • Three Waters: Support the Three Waters reforms. Our water pipes are broken – we need a new approach.

    Sewage out: getting the sewage out of our streams, rivers and coastlines. Old systems that need a complete overhaul.

    Alert systems: new network of coastal and river alerts to warn of flooding and coastal inundation (Wellington city coastline).

  • Work with the Department of Internal Affairs on the Three Waters bill. More clarity is needed. I can see benefit of four entities managing Three Waters poorly vs 67 managing water poorly!

    Back to basics approach to water supply and delivery. Need to take a more integrated approach to freshwater management and urban development.

    Introduce water meters as a priority. Wellington has one of the world's highest water consumption rate at 350 litres a day per capita.

  • Put fluoride back in to the Wellington drinking water supply.

    Encourage water conservation by providing a grey water and water storage advisory service for urban residents.

    Ensure rural community water schemes are not impacted by Three Waters ownership or management changes.

  • Bring core council services back in house to build up local capacity, reduce costs and reinvest funds in the city and its people.

    Support 'Three Waters' reform while advocating for public ownership and greater accountability to local communities and mana whenua.

    Adapt to climate change: repair core infrastructure like pipes and retaining walls, and help homes and businesses conserve and store water.

  • Make fixing the leaks in our water and waste systems a top priority.

    Hold Wellington Water to performance targets, including leak repair.

    Move quickly to establish a new water source to future-proof our supply.

  • Recommend to Three Waters Agency that by 2050 the network infrastructure leakage Index (ILI) for drinking water down to two or less.

    Recommend that Greater Wellington Regional Council amends regulations so that Three Waters Agency must identify all illegal wastewater cross connections by 2030 and correct.

    Recommend Greater Wellington Regional Council to Three Waters agency and TLAs to incorporate Water Sensitive Urban Design into all stormwater and water conservation measures.

  • Bring core council services back in house to build up local capacity, reduce costs and reinvest funds in the city and its people.

    Support 'Three Waters' reform while advocating for public ownership and greater accountability to local communities and mana whenua.

    Adapt to climate change: repair core infrastructure like pipes and retaining walls, and help homes and businesses conserve and store water.

  • Ensure that the Three Waters are operating efficiently and with health and safety being primary.

    Promote best practice and effective risk management in respect of preparation for environmental issues and failures.

  • Support the Three Waters reform so that all New Zealanders can have generational security of essential services, that is not funded by rates.

  • Support regional council carrying out due diligence in its role transferring essential water infrastructure assets to the National Transfer Unit.

  • Three Waters: Support the Three Waters reforms. Our water pipes are broken – we need a new approach.

    Sewage out: getting the sewage out of our streams, rivers and coastlines. Old systems that need a complete overhaul.

    Alert systems: new network of coastal and river alerts to warn of flooding and coastal inundation (Wellington city coastline).

  • Work with the Department of Internal Affairs on the Three Waters bill. More clarity is needed. I can see benefit of four entities managing Three Waters poorly vs 67 managing water poorly!

    Back to basics approach to water supply and delivery. Need to take a more integrated approach to freshwater management and urban development.

    Introduce water meters as a priority. Wellington has one of the world's highest water consumption rate at 350 litres a day per capita.

  • Put fluoride back in to the Wellington drinking water supply.

    Encourage water conservation by providing a grey water and water storage advisory service for urban residents.

    Ensure rural community water schemes are not impacted by Three Waters ownership or management changes.

  • Bring core council services back in house to build up local capacity, reduce costs and reinvest funds in the city and its people.

    Support 'Three Waters' reform while advocating for public ownership and greater accountability to local communities and mana whenua.

    Adapt to climate change: repair core infrastructure like pipes and retaining walls, and help homes and businesses conserve and store water.

  • Make fixing the leaks in our water and waste systems a top priority.

    Hold Wellington Water to performance targets, including leak repair.

    Move quickly to establish a new water source to future-proof our supply.

  • Recommend to Three Waters Agency that by 2050 the network infrastructure leakage Index (ILI) for drinking water down to two or less.

    Recommend that Greater Wellington Regional Council amends regulations so that Three Waters Agency must identify all illegal wastewater cross connections by 2030 and correct.

    Recommend Greater Wellington Regional Council to Three Waters agency and TLAs to incorporate Water Sensitive Urban Design into all stormwater and water conservation measures.

  • Bring core council services back in house to build up local capacity, reduce costs and reinvest funds in the city and its people.

    Support 'Three Waters' reform while advocating for public ownership and greater accountability to local communities and mana whenua.

    Adapt to climate change: repair core infrastructure like pipes and retaining walls, and help homes and businesses conserve and store water.

  • Ensure that the Three Waters are operating efficiently and with health and safety being primary.

    Promote best practice and effective risk management in respect of preparation for environmental issues and failures.

  • Support the Three Waters reform so that all New Zealanders can have generational security of essential services, that is not funded by rates.