Otago Regional Council

Dunstan Constituency
The Otago Regional Council makes decisions about managing resources in the region, such as air, water, soil and the coastline. It also carries out plant and pest control, helps prepare for natural disasters, and is involved in regional transport. The council is made up of 11 councillors. Councillors are elected to represent constituencies (areas in the region). Three councillors will be elected from the Dunstan constituency. This is a first past the post (FPP) election, so you vote by ticking the name of your preferred candidate on your ballot paper. Compare the candidates and their policies to decide who to vote for in the Otago Regional Council election.

Local democracy

Local government is a foundational part of our democracy. But local democracy isn’t just about holding elections every three years – it’s about the day-to-day ways people have their say in the decisions that affect us all.

Local democracy

Local government is a foundational part of our democracy. But local democracy isn’t just about holding elections every three years – it’s about the day-to-day ways people have their say in the decisions that affect us all.

  • Regular interaction with community and ensuring availability to engage with individuals and groups.

    Being respectful of other councillors' views and debate at the council table, but being a vocal advocate for Dunstan.

    Being respectful of the statutory requirements from central government, and engagement with iwi, while ensuring the best interests of Otago.

  • Honest, open, transparent governance and communication is the first priority. Trusting communities with settled science makes better outcomes.

    I'm not a fan of co-governance because it creates policy input and decision-making based, upon, not ethnicity but, iwi membership.

    There are too many councils in NZ each existing in their own silo, generally over-staffed and all with overpaid senior managements.

  • Ensure mana whenua have input opportunity to all Otago Regional Council policy. Includes working with our staff to increase understanding of Te Ao Māori.

    Increase our levels of community engagement to listen, support and educate through Freshwater Management Units and catchment groups.

    Improve bus driver wages and conditions and build greater respect for their work. This will support a better public transport system.

  • Support Māori representation with full voting on the council as of right.

  • Continue and strengthen the practice of involving mana whenua at the beginning of conversations.

    Be opened minded about impending local government reform.

    Ensure that the size of the organisation is fit for purpose.

  • Regular interaction with community and ensuring availability to engage with individuals and groups.

    Being respectful of other councillors' views and debate at the council table, but being a vocal advocate for Dunstan.

    Being respectful of the statutory requirements from central government, and engagement with iwi, while ensuring the best interests of Otago.

  • Honest, open, transparent governance and communication is the first priority. Trusting communities with settled science makes better outcomes.

    I'm not a fan of co-governance because it creates policy input and decision-making based, upon, not ethnicity but, iwi membership.

    There are too many councils in NZ each existing in their own silo, generally over-staffed and all with overpaid senior managements.

  • Ensure mana whenua have input opportunity to all Otago Regional Council policy. Includes working with our staff to increase understanding of Te Ao Māori.

    Increase our levels of community engagement to listen, support and educate through Freshwater Management Units and catchment groups.

    Improve bus driver wages and conditions and build greater respect for their work. This will support a better public transport system.

  • Support Māori representation with full voting on the council as of right.

  • Continue and strengthen the practice of involving mana whenua at the beginning of conversations.

    Be opened minded about impending local government reform.

    Ensure that the size of the organisation is fit for purpose.