Auckland Council

Albany Ward
The Auckland Council makes strategic decisions for Auckland on public transport, urban planning, environmental protection and other big issues. The council provides funding to local boards to provide public services in their areas, and manages council-controlled organisations which provide infrastructure, such as public transport, water and sewerage. The councillors and mayor make up the governing body, which shares governance of Auckland Council with the 21 local boards. The governing body is made up of 20 councillors plus the mayor. Councillors are elected to represent wards (areas in Auckland). Two councillors will be elected from your ward. This is a first past the post (FPP) election, so you vote by ticking the name of your preferred candidate on your ballot paper. Compare the candidates and their policies to decide who to vote for in the Auckland Council election.

Rates and revenue

The work of local government is funded mainly by property taxes in the local area, known as rates. This makes up around 60% of council expenditure, with the rest coming from user charges, investment income, regulatory fees and roading subsidies. Councils can also borrow money to spread the cost of large investments such as infrastructure over a longer period of time.

Rates and revenue

The work of local government is funded mainly by property taxes in the local area, known as rates. This makes up around 60% of council expenditure, with the rest coming from user charges, investment income, regulatory fees and roading subsidies. Councils can also borrow money to spread the cost of large investments such as infrastructure over a longer period of time.

  • No rates rise in 2023, to offset inflation and living costs, caused partly by Auckland Council's excessive borrowing. Cancel Auckland petrol tax.

    Cancel all unnecessary spending, such as bicycle lanes (costing 2 billion), that 82% of ratepayers don't want, along with 'climate nonsense'.

    Rationalise debt to revenue ratio. Council spends almost three times what it earns (300%). Debt has risen $4,000 million since 2016 – not good.

  • Increase emphasis on efficiency and effectiveness across council operations especially as it goes to project delivery and value for money.

    Cease use of Auckland-wide targeted rates and review impact and effectiveness of regional fuel tax.

    Recognise financial hardship and effects of rate increases, retain council investments returning net revenue – contributing to lower rates.

  • Ring-fence the developer's contribution levy to be spent in the local area in which it was generated.

    Establish a centralised 'project office' which oversees Council-controlled Organisation projects and forces collaboration, economies of scale and efficiency.

    Focus on core council business with an emphasis on value for money across all council services and projects.

  • Introduce new policies of freeing up council money for Aucklanders while effectively, efficiently reducing council costs through budgeting.

    Immediately reduce council debt, fees and charges and rates with tactical, prudent, shrewd planned financial management at all levels.

    Increase council profits in council investments and assets for all Aucklanders benefit, improvement and large rate rebates; rental rebates

  • Improve council's revenue across income-generating assets such as ports, stadiums, recreational, cultural facilities via boosted patronage.

    Cease use of Auckland-wide targeted rates and review impact and effectiveness of regional fuel tax.

    Recognise financial hardship and effects of rate increases, retain council investments returning net revenue contributing to lower rates.

  • Commit to operational expenditure and debt repayments being fully serviced from rates and fees income.

    Ensure that long term infrastructure investment costs are spread over a lifetime of use by way of debt management.

    Communicate clearly how council spending is being utilised and directly answering or finding out the answers to voter questions on spend.

  • Reinvest expenditure back into communities, ie targeted rates back into targeted communities.

    Find ways to meet financial obligations that veer away from selling council assets.

    Invest money into projects now to prevent rising future costs.

  • No rates rise in 2023, to offset inflation and living costs, caused partly by Auckland Council's excessive borrowing. Cancel Auckland petrol tax.

    Cancel all unnecessary spending, such as bicycle lanes (costing 2 billion), that 82% of ratepayers don't want, along with 'climate nonsense'.

    Rationalise debt to revenue ratio. Council spends almost three times what it earns (300%). Debt has risen $4,000 million since 2016 – not good.

  • Increase emphasis on efficiency and effectiveness across council operations especially as it goes to project delivery and value for money.

    Cease use of Auckland-wide targeted rates and review impact and effectiveness of regional fuel tax.

    Recognise financial hardship and effects of rate increases, retain council investments returning net revenue – contributing to lower rates.

  • Ring-fence the developer's contribution levy to be spent in the local area in which it was generated.

    Establish a centralised 'project office' which oversees Council-controlled Organisation projects and forces collaboration, economies of scale and efficiency.

    Focus on core council business with an emphasis on value for money across all council services and projects.

  • Introduce new policies of freeing up council money for Aucklanders while effectively, efficiently reducing council costs through budgeting.

    Immediately reduce council debt, fees and charges and rates with tactical, prudent, shrewd planned financial management at all levels.

    Increase council profits in council investments and assets for all Aucklanders benefit, improvement and large rate rebates; rental rebates

  • Improve council's revenue across income-generating assets such as ports, stadiums, recreational, cultural facilities via boosted patronage.

    Cease use of Auckland-wide targeted rates and review impact and effectiveness of regional fuel tax.

    Recognise financial hardship and effects of rate increases, retain council investments returning net revenue contributing to lower rates.

  • Commit to operational expenditure and debt repayments being fully serviced from rates and fees income.

    Ensure that long term infrastructure investment costs are spread over a lifetime of use by way of debt management.

    Communicate clearly how council spending is being utilised and directly answering or finding out the answers to voter questions on spend.

  • Reinvest expenditure back into communities, ie targeted rates back into targeted communities.

    Find ways to meet financial obligations that veer away from selling council assets.

    Invest money into projects now to prevent rising future costs.

Auckland Council - Find Candidates
Auckland Council - Find Candidates