Dunedin City Council

The Dunedin City Council provides local services and facilities, such as public transport, rubbish and recycling, libraries, parks, and recreation facilities. It also makes decisions about building and planning, local regulations, and infrastructure, such as water supply and sewerage. The council is made up of 14 councillors and the mayor. This is a single transferable vote (STV) election, so you vote by ranking the candidates on your ballot paper. Compare the candidates and their policies to decide who to vote for in the Dunedin City Council election.

Housing and planning

Local councils are responsible for land use planning under the Resource Management Act, which affects where and how new houses are constructed, as well as the design of cities and towns. In some areas, councils also provide housing to those who need it most.

Housing and planning

Local councils are responsible for land use planning under the Resource Management Act, which affects where and how new houses are constructed, as well as the design of cities and towns. In some areas, councils also provide housing to those who need it most.

  • Implement recommendations from the refreshed Housing Action Plan, continue the city wide community engagement in this space.

    Continue to upgrade/maintain council social housing stock, promoting positive engagement with our tenants.

    Address council policies and procedures to ensure they are easy to access and understand, offering advice on climate friendly options.

  • Investigate the council housing in Dunedin.

  • Reducing the wait time of consents and having pre-approved home plan to shorten the wait period.

    Working with a third party agency to build and manage social housing to maximise return to the ratepayer.

    Rezone the suburbs to encourage higher density housing development.

  • Reduce regulations surrounding building consents, so that property developers can build on their private property easily.

    Prioritise women and children for council housing who have been made homeless due to domestic violence or Family Court actions.

    Subsidise water blasting rentals and fence paint so that property owners can freshen up their property facing the street.

  • Make the consent process cheaper, simpler and faster so it is easier for developers to build new houses to help meet growing demand.

    Update existing stock of council housing to be "fit for purpose" ie in terms of number of bedrooms and accessibility.

    Review the utilisation of all land owned by the council. Could some unused spaces be converted into community gardens?

  • Find root causes for the housing crisis while upgrading existing council flats and building more.

    Commit to improving the building consent process (end to end), with a focus on improved communication and support and reduced waiting times.

    Enable more inner city living, ensuring current city activities that are cherished, ie live music, is protected.

  • Partner with community housing organisations to provide secure housing for our most vulnerable children and families.

    Repurpose some council owned land to increase the supply of housing.

    Work more strategically with developers who come up with viable ideas but need significant support to get projects across the line.

  • Civic housing as a human right. Ensure provision of sufficient night shelters, transitionary housing and social renting properties for city.

    Create further changes to the Dunedin City Council Community Housing Policy to create more kamatua housing, working with iwi and Kāinga Ora.

    Enforce terms outlined in the Building Act 2004 to landlords and support renters to know their rights as per Residential Tenancies Act 1986.

  • Continue policies that ensure development occurs in the most sensible places (as identified in the Spatial Plan).

    Complete the upgrades of key public spaces, especially in the central city, but in other centres also.

    Retain and expand our social housing stock.

  • Encourage further development by increasing the speed of consents being processed – not making it difficult to obtain a consent.

    Promote a full review of the 2GP to make it more practical when making land available for development.

    Grow council housing supply.

  • Commit to improving the consent process and making it more timely and transparent.

    Commit to more investment in community housing for our most vulnerable.

    Support the ongoing development of the CBD as an accessible destination for all residents and visitors.

  • Work in with the government to reduce costs to ratepayers but improve outcomes for those in need of social housing.

    Launch a modular home initiative to reduce cost of housing and build twice as many for the same money.

    Strongly encourage the construction of accessible housing.

  • Investigate zoning requirements to encourage rent affordability.

    Address the red-tape requirements for building consents. There is too much delay, expense and unnecessary hoop jumping in the current model.

  • Increase community housing funding.

    Implement a rental Warrant of Fitness.

    Advocate for direct central government capital investment into housing.

  • Reduce red tape with building consents so housing can be built more efficiently.

    Develop ways to effectively monitor tenants in Kāinga Ora homes and provide support to them to be good neighbours.

    Have a process to ensure all landlords are adhering to the Healthy Homes regulations for weather tightness and appropriate rent prices.

  • Ensure that council housing is up to date in weathertightness and has been maintained to a high standard.

    Building consents processes sould be more streamlined and simpler to use. The cost of applications lowered to encourage development.

  • Strengthen by-laws to ensure all properties (residential and commercial) within the CBD are safe, functional, and add value to Dunedin.

    Review Dunedin City Council consents to ensure a range of alternative products are able to be utilised within the building industry.

    Work in partnership with stakeholders to provide safe, affordable and sustainable community housing.

  • Faster consent processes for building consents.

    More council housing for people on low incomes. Government funding to be accessed as well.

  • Continue the council's work alongside our community, mana whenua, Kāinga Ora and others to develop a housing plan focused on creating more homes.

    Advocate at central government level for the long-term investment in many more homes that are warm, accessible and culturally-appropriate.

    Continue the provision of housing, to ensure our tenants have warm, accessible and safe homes.

  • Continue to support council's $20 million work programme over 10 years to provide more warm, dry homes and work with social housing providers.

    Enable inner city living, but initiate a 2GP variation to ensure adequate safe guards around reverse sensitivity and live music venues.

    Support work to streamline council's building consent processes and build relationships with developers to benefit communities.

  • Rethink 2GP and allow for greater urban intensification. Remove the red tape for land developers and have active council participation.

    Provide healthy home grants/interest free loans to properties that have poor insulation, ventilation or heating. Partner with central government.

    Open more land for residential and commercial development. Halt any further residential expansion onto fertile soils of the Taieri Plains.

  • Building consents often take longer than people would like. We need to attract more experienced planners to get this work done in good time.

    Communication needs to be improved between departments so drainage talks to building etc and people can get answers quicker and save costs.

    Revert George Street back to two way traffic and advocate to keep the one way, by the hospital, one way not two way to ease traffic flow.

  • Do not allow high quality farmland to be used for residential development and stop urban sprawl.

    Remove all barriers to higher density housing whilst retaining and preserving the character of the city and green space.

    Ensure that all new houses are fully insulated, energy efficient and double or triple glazed and that older housing is retrofitted.

  • We urgently need more land opened up to development. I cannot overstate how urgent this is.

    Council flats. We need a lot more! We also need to upgrade all the current flats to double glazing insulation. This is an investment.

  • Increase the supply of land available for housing through allowing more infill housing, duplexes and ancillary residential units.

    Partner with a community housing provider to enable us to get income related rents for new housing and increase our community housing.

    Create and ongoing working group of social services, community housing providers, iwi to work through challenges together around housing.

  • Work with community to build city planning goals to enable 50-year vision and long term thinking around land use.

    Transform Dunedin Heritage Strategy 2007 into a Heritage Action Plan with focussed outcomes to protect and enhance heritage assets.

    Implement Housing Action Plan 2022 to ensure everyone has a suitable warm, safe, affordable home. Support council housing.

  • Encourage all student landlords to meet the Healthy Homes standards as soon as possible.

    Remove the perception, if not the reality, that getting all consents is a long and difficult process.

    Support tougher penalties and implications on owners of derelict and unsafe buildings.

  • Implement recommendations from the refreshed Housing Action Plan, continue the city wide community engagement in this space.

    Continue to upgrade/maintain council social housing stock, promoting positive engagement with our tenants.

    Address council policies and procedures to ensure they are easy to access and understand, offering advice on climate friendly options.

  • Investigate the council housing in Dunedin.

  • Reducing the wait time of consents and having pre-approved home plan to shorten the wait period.

    Working with a third party agency to build and manage social housing to maximise return to the ratepayer.

    Rezone the suburbs to encourage higher density housing development.

  • Reduce regulations surrounding building consents, so that property developers can build on their private property easily.

    Prioritise women and children for council housing who have been made homeless due to domestic violence or Family Court actions.

    Subsidise water blasting rentals and fence paint so that property owners can freshen up their property facing the street.

  • Make the consent process cheaper, simpler and faster so it is easier for developers to build new houses to help meet growing demand.

    Update existing stock of council housing to be "fit for purpose" ie in terms of number of bedrooms and accessibility.

    Review the utilisation of all land owned by the council. Could some unused spaces be converted into community gardens?

  • Find root causes for the housing crisis while upgrading existing council flats and building more.

    Commit to improving the building consent process (end to end), with a focus on improved communication and support and reduced waiting times.

    Enable more inner city living, ensuring current city activities that are cherished, ie live music, is protected.

  • Partner with community housing organisations to provide secure housing for our most vulnerable children and families.

    Repurpose some council owned land to increase the supply of housing.

    Work more strategically with developers who come up with viable ideas but need significant support to get projects across the line.

  • Civic housing as a human right. Ensure provision of sufficient night shelters, transitionary housing and social renting properties for city.

    Create further changes to the Dunedin City Council Community Housing Policy to create more kamatua housing, working with iwi and Kāinga Ora.

    Enforce terms outlined in the Building Act 2004 to landlords and support renters to know their rights as per Residential Tenancies Act 1986.

  • Continue policies that ensure development occurs in the most sensible places (as identified in the Spatial Plan).

    Complete the upgrades of key public spaces, especially in the central city, but in other centres also.

    Retain and expand our social housing stock.

  • Encourage further development by increasing the speed of consents being processed – not making it difficult to obtain a consent.

    Promote a full review of the 2GP to make it more practical when making land available for development.

    Grow council housing supply.

  • Commit to improving the consent process and making it more timely and transparent.

    Commit to more investment in community housing for our most vulnerable.

    Support the ongoing development of the CBD as an accessible destination for all residents and visitors.

  • Work in with the government to reduce costs to ratepayers but improve outcomes for those in need of social housing.

    Launch a modular home initiative to reduce cost of housing and build twice as many for the same money.

    Strongly encourage the construction of accessible housing.

  • Investigate zoning requirements to encourage rent affordability.

    Address the red-tape requirements for building consents. There is too much delay, expense and unnecessary hoop jumping in the current model.

  • Increase community housing funding.

    Implement a rental Warrant of Fitness.

    Advocate for direct central government capital investment into housing.

  • Reduce red tape with building consents so housing can be built more efficiently.

    Develop ways to effectively monitor tenants in Kāinga Ora homes and provide support to them to be good neighbours.

    Have a process to ensure all landlords are adhering to the Healthy Homes regulations for weather tightness and appropriate rent prices.

  • Ensure that council housing is up to date in weathertightness and has been maintained to a high standard.

    Building consents processes sould be more streamlined and simpler to use. The cost of applications lowered to encourage development.

  • Strengthen by-laws to ensure all properties (residential and commercial) within the CBD are safe, functional, and add value to Dunedin.

    Review Dunedin City Council consents to ensure a range of alternative products are able to be utilised within the building industry.

    Work in partnership with stakeholders to provide safe, affordable and sustainable community housing.

  • Faster consent processes for building consents.

    More council housing for people on low incomes. Government funding to be accessed as well.

  • Continue the council's work alongside our community, mana whenua, Kāinga Ora and others to develop a housing plan focused on creating more homes.

    Advocate at central government level for the long-term investment in many more homes that are warm, accessible and culturally-appropriate.

    Continue the provision of housing, to ensure our tenants have warm, accessible and safe homes.

  • Continue to support council's $20 million work programme over 10 years to provide more warm, dry homes and work with social housing providers.

    Enable inner city living, but initiate a 2GP variation to ensure adequate safe guards around reverse sensitivity and live music venues.

    Support work to streamline council's building consent processes and build relationships with developers to benefit communities.

  • Rethink 2GP and allow for greater urban intensification. Remove the red tape for land developers and have active council participation.

    Provide healthy home grants/interest free loans to properties that have poor insulation, ventilation or heating. Partner with central government.

    Open more land for residential and commercial development. Halt any further residential expansion onto fertile soils of the Taieri Plains.

  • Building consents often take longer than people would like. We need to attract more experienced planners to get this work done in good time.

    Communication needs to be improved between departments so drainage talks to building etc and people can get answers quicker and save costs.

    Revert George Street back to two way traffic and advocate to keep the one way, by the hospital, one way not two way to ease traffic flow.

  • Do not allow high quality farmland to be used for residential development and stop urban sprawl.

    Remove all barriers to higher density housing whilst retaining and preserving the character of the city and green space.

    Ensure that all new houses are fully insulated, energy efficient and double or triple glazed and that older housing is retrofitted.

  • We urgently need more land opened up to development. I cannot overstate how urgent this is.

    Council flats. We need a lot more! We also need to upgrade all the current flats to double glazing insulation. This is an investment.

  • Increase the supply of land available for housing through allowing more infill housing, duplexes and ancillary residential units.

    Partner with a community housing provider to enable us to get income related rents for new housing and increase our community housing.

    Create and ongoing working group of social services, community housing providers, iwi to work through challenges together around housing.

  • Work with community to build city planning goals to enable 50-year vision and long term thinking around land use.

    Transform Dunedin Heritage Strategy 2007 into a Heritage Action Plan with focussed outcomes to protect and enhance heritage assets.

    Implement Housing Action Plan 2022 to ensure everyone has a suitable warm, safe, affordable home. Support council housing.

  • Encourage all student landlords to meet the Healthy Homes standards as soon as possible.

    Remove the perception, if not the reality, that getting all consents is a long and difficult process.

    Support tougher penalties and implications on owners of derelict and unsafe buildings.