Dunedin City Council

The Dunedin City Council provides local services and facilities, such as public transport, rubbish and recycling, libraries, parks, and recreation facilities. It also makes decisions about building and planning, local regulations, and infrastructure, such as water supply and sewerage. The council is made up of 14 councillors and the mayor. This is a single transferable vote (STV) election, so you vote by ranking the candidates on your ballot paper. Compare the candidates and their policies to decide who to vote for in the Dunedin City Council election.

Rates and revenue

The work of local government is funded mainly by property taxes in the local area, known as rates. This makes up around 60% of council expenditure, with the rest coming from user charges, investment income, regulatory fees and roading subsidies. Councils can also borrow money to spread the cost of large investments such as infrastructure over a longer period of time.

Rates and revenue

The work of local government is funded mainly by property taxes in the local area, known as rates. This makes up around 60% of council expenditure, with the rest coming from user charges, investment income, regulatory fees and roading subsidies. Councils can also borrow money to spread the cost of large investments such as infrastructure over a longer period of time.

  • Fight to hold rates increases to no higher than the level of inflation.

    Look at how council-owned companies can return a dividend and not increase debt.

    Attempt to reduce the overall debt levels of the council without stopping all capital spending.

  • Council debt needs to be tightly management and trimed as we can not keep going with this.

    Rates should not be raised for the sake of raising them. Other options should be looked at first.

  • Sound investment plans to ensure the city gets the best out of its investments – the Waipori Fund, investment properties and Group companies.

    Introduce a targeted rate to help pay for local social housing and increase annual investment into housing during a time of housing crisis.

    Introduce a levy on developers to fund infrastructure in new sub divisions. Housing is no longer affordable, we need to focus on social housing.

  • The city was built on generational investment. We owe it to future generations to use our rates to invest in future services.

    Rates must be seen as an investment not a cost. Work with central government to fund their share of infrastructure of national importance.

    The council must lead with vision and courage looking to the future, not the present or the past – embracing the Dunedin City Council strategic framework.

  • Control rates increases to be reasonable and justified, extend the rate relief grant scheme to support rate-payers experiencing hardship.

    Control spending to align with Dunedin City Council strategies so that return on investment is measurable and aligned to long term plans.

    Ensure that debt levels remain manageable for the size of our city and review the city's investments to ensure optimum return.

  • Financially prudent decision making, limiting expenditure on non essential items and divert funds to sound infrastructure projects.

    Increase investment revenue opportunities through growing property portfolios and partnerships with business. Revenue streams to increase.

    Diversify council income and cap increases at 6.5%. Scrutinise all council debt to ensure cost/benefit is favourable.

  • Retain the current rating policy and public/private good balance.

    Ensure council debt remains within agreed parameters, and retain ownership of council companies.

    Use debt to ensure inter-generational equity for long-life assets.

  • Reduce planned expenditure in the 10 year plan. Focus on essential works.

    Reduce the forecast increase in rates. Try to achieve a cap at 5% per annum.

    Assess all council investments. If they are not providing a reasonable return on investment or direct benefit to the people of Dunedin then consider selling.

  • Keeping rates rise to minimum and work towards maximising the return of investment from CCC.

    Reset and rethink on major project to move together in the direction of only fix what is necessary in order to control debt.

    Working towards prevention maintenance around the city rather than fixing when broken to avoid costly remedies.

  • Debt is forecast to increase to $440.3 million in the 2022-23 years. Projects that could be temporarily shelved are cycle ways and park ride.

  • Review our investments and have regular reporting on our investment portfolio to ensure prudent management and sustainable returns.

    Create fees and charges that enable discounts for those on community services cards and lessen the burden on lower incomes.

  • Charge fairer water rates based on usage.

    Use some of the Waipori Fund to increase housing supply.

    Stop using intergenerational debt to fund city assets.

  • Rein in spending, and keep rates rises to a minimum. Focus on infrastructure and amenities.

  • Advocate for rates reductions.

    Aim to reduce debt.

    Advocate for redirection of GST revenue from construction to local government for infrastructure development.

  • Maintain Dunedin City Council rates increases at about five percent per year.

    I will invest in projects that could generate profits such as shares, coal mining, oil drilling, and rental motor bike business.

    I will increase financial accountability in order to reduce wasteful council spending like $40,000 on dots, $342,000 on Charcoal Blue, $60 million George St.

  • Scrutinise budgets closely, with awareness of the impact rates rises have on residents whilst ensuring our city continues sustainable progress.

    Providing payment options, support for residents and promoting these.

  • Create accountability processes for rates increases and transparency to the public.

    Create a process that allows for community engagement for local projects for the city versus vanity projects that aren't needed.

    Create transparency for council debt and spending to the public and opportunity for public engagement.

  • Continue to develop an equitable city that is easy and enjoyable to live in.

    Advocate at central government level so that rates rebates are realistic.

    Advocate for name corrections to funds so that mana whenua history is accurately acknowledged.

  • Ensure debt is held at a level requiring minimal rates increases, and that finance matters are informed by a detailed cost-benefit analysis.

    Maximise the return on investment by ensuring all Dunedin City Council owned properties are safe, functional and fully let/developed; adding value to Dunedin.

    Review Dunedin City Council contracts to restrict sub-contracting and to curtail profiteering at ratepayers' expense.

  • Ensure frivolous spending is stopped.

    Approach the financial operation of the city more like a business and not enter every action planning to go further into debt.

    Keep rates increases to a minimum and away from crippling generational debt, and towards financial sustainability.

  • Keep rates rises to sensible and appropriate amounts that community find acceptable.

    Stop council adding last minute rates rises through Annual Plan process by not supporting ad-hoc, non-researched and analysed pet projects.

    Manage council council-controlled organisations much more closely through better monitoring, accountability and control so they contribute funds to council.

  • Council debt. Lack of investment in local infrastructure means we now have to take on debt so now we have to borrow huge amounts of money.

    Rates increases due to inflation is Inevitable, but we can keep it manageable by good financial management.

  • Review budgets to focus on essentials, then have a program of genuine participation with councillors about what comes next in priority.

    Review council controlled companies to improve returns to council.

    Review council investments to optimise them.

  • Provide clear transparency around where council expenditure goes.

    Invest in core council business first, but don't leave out growing our facilities that residents want, and deserve.

  • Continue work on council's investment policy, working towards ongoing financial gains for the city to offset rates rises.

    Continue to promote the rates rebate scheme to those eligible to receive this support, for whom the necessary rates rises are challenging.

    Consider our entry fees for aquatic facilities in light of the significant increase in drownings each year.

  • Commit to keeping rates increases to a minimum, without compromising service levels.

    Ensure debt levels remain within those set by central government at all times.

  • Reduce debt and keep rates to 5 percent or less. Rates are too high and unaffordable for many. We need more sensible spending.

    Partner with a community housing provider and lease our social housing to them so they can run council's community housing.

    Common sense spending. No more reports that cost 100s of thousands. No more $30,000 spends on fake flowers or dots. (Dots were subsidised).

  • Fight to hold rates increases to no higher than the level of inflation.

    Look at how council-owned companies can return a dividend and not increase debt.

    Attempt to reduce the overall debt levels of the council without stopping all capital spending.

  • Council debt needs to be tightly management and trimed as we can not keep going with this.

    Rates should not be raised for the sake of raising them. Other options should be looked at first.

  • Sound investment plans to ensure the city gets the best out of its investments – the Waipori Fund, investment properties and Group companies.

    Introduce a targeted rate to help pay for local social housing and increase annual investment into housing during a time of housing crisis.

    Introduce a levy on developers to fund infrastructure in new sub divisions. Housing is no longer affordable, we need to focus on social housing.

  • The city was built on generational investment. We owe it to future generations to use our rates to invest in future services.

    Rates must be seen as an investment not a cost. Work with central government to fund their share of infrastructure of national importance.

    The council must lead with vision and courage looking to the future, not the present or the past – embracing the Dunedin City Council strategic framework.

  • Control rates increases to be reasonable and justified, extend the rate relief grant scheme to support rate-payers experiencing hardship.

    Control spending to align with Dunedin City Council strategies so that return on investment is measurable and aligned to long term plans.

    Ensure that debt levels remain manageable for the size of our city and review the city's investments to ensure optimum return.

  • Financially prudent decision making, limiting expenditure on non essential items and divert funds to sound infrastructure projects.

    Increase investment revenue opportunities through growing property portfolios and partnerships with business. Revenue streams to increase.

    Diversify council income and cap increases at 6.5%. Scrutinise all council debt to ensure cost/benefit is favourable.

  • Retain the current rating policy and public/private good balance.

    Ensure council debt remains within agreed parameters, and retain ownership of council companies.

    Use debt to ensure inter-generational equity for long-life assets.

  • Reduce planned expenditure in the 10 year plan. Focus on essential works.

    Reduce the forecast increase in rates. Try to achieve a cap at 5% per annum.

    Assess all council investments. If they are not providing a reasonable return on investment or direct benefit to the people of Dunedin then consider selling.

  • Keeping rates rise to minimum and work towards maximising the return of investment from CCC.

    Reset and rethink on major project to move together in the direction of only fix what is necessary in order to control debt.

    Working towards prevention maintenance around the city rather than fixing when broken to avoid costly remedies.

  • Debt is forecast to increase to $440.3 million in the 2022-23 years. Projects that could be temporarily shelved are cycle ways and park ride.

  • Review our investments and have regular reporting on our investment portfolio to ensure prudent management and sustainable returns.

    Create fees and charges that enable discounts for those on community services cards and lessen the burden on lower incomes.

  • Charge fairer water rates based on usage.

    Use some of the Waipori Fund to increase housing supply.

    Stop using intergenerational debt to fund city assets.

  • Rein in spending, and keep rates rises to a minimum. Focus on infrastructure and amenities.

  • Advocate for rates reductions.

    Aim to reduce debt.

    Advocate for redirection of GST revenue from construction to local government for infrastructure development.

  • Maintain Dunedin City Council rates increases at about five percent per year.

    I will invest in projects that could generate profits such as shares, coal mining, oil drilling, and rental motor bike business.

    I will increase financial accountability in order to reduce wasteful council spending like $40,000 on dots, $342,000 on Charcoal Blue, $60 million George St.

  • Scrutinise budgets closely, with awareness of the impact rates rises have on residents whilst ensuring our city continues sustainable progress.

    Providing payment options, support for residents and promoting these.

  • Create accountability processes for rates increases and transparency to the public.

    Create a process that allows for community engagement for local projects for the city versus vanity projects that aren't needed.

    Create transparency for council debt and spending to the public and opportunity for public engagement.

  • Continue to develop an equitable city that is easy and enjoyable to live in.

    Advocate at central government level so that rates rebates are realistic.

    Advocate for name corrections to funds so that mana whenua history is accurately acknowledged.

  • Ensure debt is held at a level requiring minimal rates increases, and that finance matters are informed by a detailed cost-benefit analysis.

    Maximise the return on investment by ensuring all Dunedin City Council owned properties are safe, functional and fully let/developed; adding value to Dunedin.

    Review Dunedin City Council contracts to restrict sub-contracting and to curtail profiteering at ratepayers' expense.

  • Ensure frivolous spending is stopped.

    Approach the financial operation of the city more like a business and not enter every action planning to go further into debt.

    Keep rates increases to a minimum and away from crippling generational debt, and towards financial sustainability.

  • Keep rates rises to sensible and appropriate amounts that community find acceptable.

    Stop council adding last minute rates rises through Annual Plan process by not supporting ad-hoc, non-researched and analysed pet projects.

    Manage council council-controlled organisations much more closely through better monitoring, accountability and control so they contribute funds to council.

  • Council debt. Lack of investment in local infrastructure means we now have to take on debt so now we have to borrow huge amounts of money.

    Rates increases due to inflation is Inevitable, but we can keep it manageable by good financial management.

  • Review budgets to focus on essentials, then have a program of genuine participation with councillors about what comes next in priority.

    Review council controlled companies to improve returns to council.

    Review council investments to optimise them.

  • Provide clear transparency around where council expenditure goes.

    Invest in core council business first, but don't leave out growing our facilities that residents want, and deserve.

  • Continue work on council's investment policy, working towards ongoing financial gains for the city to offset rates rises.

    Continue to promote the rates rebate scheme to those eligible to receive this support, for whom the necessary rates rises are challenging.

    Consider our entry fees for aquatic facilities in light of the significant increase in drownings each year.

  • Commit to keeping rates increases to a minimum, without compromising service levels.

    Ensure debt levels remain within those set by central government at all times.

  • Reduce debt and keep rates to 5 percent or less. Rates are too high and unaffordable for many. We need more sensible spending.

    Partner with a community housing provider and lease our social housing to them so they can run council's community housing.

    Common sense spending. No more reports that cost 100s of thousands. No more $30,000 spends on fake flowers or dots. (Dots were subsidised).