Mayor of Far North District

The mayor is the leader of the council. Their job is to promote a vision for the district and lead the development of the council’s plans, policies and budget. The mayor appoints the deputy mayor, establishes committees for particular topics, and appoints chairs for those committees. This is a single transferable vote (STV) election, so you vote by ranking the candidates on your ballot paper. Compare the candidates and their policies to decide who to vote for in the Far North District Council mayoral election.

Local democracy

Local government is a foundational part of our democracy. But local democracy isn’t just about holding elections every three years – it’s about the day-to-day ways people have their say in the decisions that affect us all.

Local democracy

Local government is a foundational part of our democracy. But local democracy isn’t just about holding elections every three years – it’s about the day-to-day ways people have their say in the decisions that affect us all.

  • Engagement with mana whenua/communities will be lead by councillors/community board members as they are elected by the people they serve.

    Review new CEO's key performance indicators to ensure continuous improvement of service delivery, work programmes, cost-effectiveness by staff and contractors.

    Adopt a plain language policy to be easier for all to understand and respond to council communications, policies, reports. Improve RFS.

  • Resource communities and give delegated responsibilities to make governance decisions on matters specific to their communities – localism.

    Create local governance boards where Māori and all ethnicities can formally engage at the local level, thus creating true local democracy.

    Drive a culture of service, empowerment and innovation through council and into local communities to deliver staff and community wellbeing.

  • Work with hapū within the Far North to allow a seamless flow into co-governance and support Te Wakaputanga and Tiriti o Waitangi.

    Work with Election New Zealand in encouraging Māori to transfer onto the Māori roll in the next change over.

  • Greater representation in person from the council and new "Mayor" for the "Far North" is required, currently it's an undoable option.

    Māori involvement is catered for under law as are assorted ethnic community representations, more is better.

    Council to reform to reflect our modern lifestyle requirements.

  • Use communication tools effectively to keep residents in the loop on council happenings.

    Get council Living Wage accredited.

    Frequently travel the district to be available to residents to genuinely listen, engage and take action on their behalf.

  • Incorporate tikanga into how we engage and work with Māori. Work collaboratively, within the frameworks of Te Ao Māori.

    Strengthen our practice of engagement and public participation in policy and project solutions. Hold focus groups, local government "clinics."

    Do governance, and do it well. Hold management to account on Key Performance Indicators (KPIs), Long Term Plan, budget and capital works programme.

  • Ditch the endless rounds of council workshops and committee meetings and get councillors out in the field. Visiting all the issues.

    Support our CEO with his restructure to ensure we put the customer at the heart of everything we do. Find reasons to say yes, not frustrate.

    Support our staff. They are our biggest resource and need to be empowered to succeed.

  • Engagement with mana whenua/communities will be lead by councillors/community board members as they are elected by the people they serve.

    Review new CEO's key performance indicators to ensure continuous improvement of service delivery, work programmes, cost-effectiveness by staff and contractors.

    Adopt a plain language policy to be easier for all to understand and respond to council communications, policies, reports. Improve RFS.

  • Resource communities and give delegated responsibilities to make governance decisions on matters specific to their communities – localism.

    Create local governance boards where Māori and all ethnicities can formally engage at the local level, thus creating true local democracy.

    Drive a culture of service, empowerment and innovation through council and into local communities to deliver staff and community wellbeing.

  • Work with hapū within the Far North to allow a seamless flow into co-governance and support Te Wakaputanga and Tiriti o Waitangi.

    Work with Election New Zealand in encouraging Māori to transfer onto the Māori roll in the next change over.

  • Greater representation in person from the council and new "Mayor" for the "Far North" is required, currently it's an undoable option.

    Māori involvement is catered for under law as are assorted ethnic community representations, more is better.

    Council to reform to reflect our modern lifestyle requirements.

  • Use communication tools effectively to keep residents in the loop on council happenings.

    Get council Living Wage accredited.

    Frequently travel the district to be available to residents to genuinely listen, engage and take action on their behalf.

  • Incorporate tikanga into how we engage and work with Māori. Work collaboratively, within the frameworks of Te Ao Māori.

    Strengthen our practice of engagement and public participation in policy and project solutions. Hold focus groups, local government "clinics."

    Do governance, and do it well. Hold management to account on Key Performance Indicators (KPIs), Long Term Plan, budget and capital works programme.

  • Ditch the endless rounds of council workshops and committee meetings and get councillors out in the field. Visiting all the issues.

    Support our CEO with his restructure to ensure we put the customer at the heart of everything we do. Find reasons to say yes, not frustrate.

    Support our staff. They are our biggest resource and need to be empowered to succeed.