Hamilton City Council

East General Ward
The Hamilton City Council provides local services and facilities, such as public transport, rubbish and recycling, libraries, parks, and recreation facilities. It also makes decisions about building and planning, local regulations, and infrastructure, such as water supply and sewerage. The council is made up of 14 councillors and the mayor. Councillors are elected to represent wards (areas in the city). Six councillors will be elected from the East ward. This is a single transferable vote (STV) election, so you vote by ranking the candidates on your ballot paper. Compare the candidates and their policies to decide who to vote for in the Hamilton City Council election.

Housing and planning

Local councils are responsible for land use planning under the Resource Management Act, which affects where and how new houses are constructed, as well as the design of cities and towns. In some areas, councils also provide housing to those who need it most.

Housing and planning

Local councils are responsible for land use planning under the Resource Management Act, which affects where and how new houses are constructed, as well as the design of cities and towns. In some areas, councils also provide housing to those who need it most.

  • Simplify building regulations and reduce red tape to encourage building and adding minor dwellings to existing properties.

    Resist government imposed regulations which have been imposed with no consultation on existing city dwellers.

    Ensure new multi level 'homes' do not become slums by researching overseas experience.

  • Make housing affordable in new developments.

    Establish a monitoring group to work with urban developers on housing intensification.

    Ban housing intensification in heritage and historical areas.

  • Keep a local perspective on high-density housing.

    Streamline the building consents process to ensure property developers are not held up by unnecessary compliance.

    Open up areas surrounding the city for housing and recreational development.

  • Support and strengthen key partners to enable affordable housing.

    Continue supporting the building of sustainable and well connected community hubs that are the heart of communities.

    Advocate and support our homeless whānau in local and national forums alongside organisations and whānau.

  • Open suburbs for a mix of single and higher density housing, including front-facing town houses.

    Investigate options similar to Finland's 'Housing First' programme to combat homelessness.

    Encourage a variety of new housing development, from single unit to larger family to support the needs of different people and whānau.

  • Commit to stopping urban sprawl.

    Commit to the development of community hubs.

    Reviewing zoning to factor in public transport needs.

  • Enable affordable housing options (to buy and rent) through smart growth and strategic partnerships.

    Build sustainable communities not just buildings with regenerative ecological designs as a priority.

  • Establish a team of external experts to design and promote an affordable housing model.

    Establish a team of both council and external design specialists to create a city-wide urban design plan.

    Promote changes to the Resource Management Act that simplify the requirements and rules for building consents and code of compliance certificate issue.

  • Encourage developers to build more higher density housing closer to the inner city.

    Creating suburban spaces where people can gather as a community.

    Ensure all houses are fit for living a healthy life.

  • Ensure the protection of trees and the provision of minimum levels of green space in higher density suburban housing developments.

    Work with central government to provide a range of housing options for homeless populations that support social integration and wellbeing.

    Improve the energy efficiency of existing housing stock through resourcing home retrofit and insulation programmes.

  • Use less red tape with building consents work, with building contractors to arrive at proper compliance with workable solutions meeting needs.

    Reduce rents by regulating the market, ensuring the landlords meet their obligations to the tenants, stopping high rentals with government control.

    Reduce homelessness by working with the people's project, finding appropriate housing. The government needs to mass produce more homes now.

  • Lobby central government against housing intensification changes that allow three storey developments without consent or planning.

    Champion green fields housing intensification due to its cost, planning and city character benefits over more infill.

    Shift council policy and compliance settings to make it easier for community groups to develop social and co-housing initiatives.

  • Make building consents more affordable for people, reducing the prices.

    Make rentals more affordable for people to live in, reducing rents so people can comfortably have enough money for food.

    Affordable housing for our young people with families can buy their first home.

  • I support housing intensification, starting from the city centre where apartment living will be enabled.

    Endorse planning rules to include well connected neighbourhoods and neighbours with everything they need close by.

    I support inclusionary zoning as a tool to provide housing affordability.

  • Simplify building regulations and reduce red tape to encourage building and adding minor dwellings to existing properties.

    Resist government imposed regulations which have been imposed with no consultation on existing city dwellers.

    Ensure new multi level 'homes' do not become slums by researching overseas experience.

  • Make housing affordable in new developments.

    Establish a monitoring group to work with urban developers on housing intensification.

    Ban housing intensification in heritage and historical areas.

  • Keep a local perspective on high-density housing.

    Streamline the building consents process to ensure property developers are not held up by unnecessary compliance.

    Open up areas surrounding the city for housing and recreational development.

  • Support and strengthen key partners to enable affordable housing.

    Continue supporting the building of sustainable and well connected community hubs that are the heart of communities.

    Advocate and support our homeless whānau in local and national forums alongside organisations and whānau.

  • Open suburbs for a mix of single and higher density housing, including front-facing town houses.

    Investigate options similar to Finland's 'Housing First' programme to combat homelessness.

    Encourage a variety of new housing development, from single unit to larger family to support the needs of different people and whānau.

  • Commit to stopping urban sprawl.

    Commit to the development of community hubs.

    Reviewing zoning to factor in public transport needs.

  • Enable affordable housing options (to buy and rent) through smart growth and strategic partnerships.

    Build sustainable communities not just buildings with regenerative ecological designs as a priority.

  • Establish a team of external experts to design and promote an affordable housing model.

    Establish a team of both council and external design specialists to create a city-wide urban design plan.

    Promote changes to the Resource Management Act that simplify the requirements and rules for building consents and code of compliance certificate issue.

  • Encourage developers to build more higher density housing closer to the inner city.

    Creating suburban spaces where people can gather as a community.

    Ensure all houses are fit for living a healthy life.

  • Ensure the protection of trees and the provision of minimum levels of green space in higher density suburban housing developments.

    Work with central government to provide a range of housing options for homeless populations that support social integration and wellbeing.

    Improve the energy efficiency of existing housing stock through resourcing home retrofit and insulation programmes.

  • Use less red tape with building consents work, with building contractors to arrive at proper compliance with workable solutions meeting needs.

    Reduce rents by regulating the market, ensuring the landlords meet their obligations to the tenants, stopping high rentals with government control.

    Reduce homelessness by working with the people's project, finding appropriate housing. The government needs to mass produce more homes now.

  • Lobby central government against housing intensification changes that allow three storey developments without consent or planning.

    Champion green fields housing intensification due to its cost, planning and city character benefits over more infill.

    Shift council policy and compliance settings to make it easier for community groups to develop social and co-housing initiatives.

  • Make building consents more affordable for people, reducing the prices.

    Make rentals more affordable for people to live in, reducing rents so people can comfortably have enough money for food.

    Affordable housing for our young people with families can buy their first home.

  • I support housing intensification, starting from the city centre where apartment living will be enabled.

    Endorse planning rules to include well connected neighbourhoods and neighbours with everything they need close by.

    I support inclusionary zoning as a tool to provide housing affordability.