Hamilton City Council

East General Ward
The Hamilton City Council provides local services and facilities, such as public transport, rubbish and recycling, libraries, parks, and recreation facilities. It also makes decisions about building and planning, local regulations, and infrastructure, such as water supply and sewerage. The council is made up of 14 councillors and the mayor. Councillors are elected to represent wards (areas in the city). Six councillors will be elected from the East ward. This is a single transferable vote (STV) election, so you vote by ranking the candidates on your ballot paper. Compare the candidates and their policies to decide who to vote for in the Hamilton City Council election.

Utilities and services

Councils are responsible for a wide range of utilities and services that we all rely on, from rubbish and recycling to street cleaning. Councils are currently also responsible for managing waste water, storm water and drinking water infrastructure – the ‘Three Waters’. But that may be about to change, with central government seeking to shift the delivery of Three Waters services to four new larger entities, which could borrow enough to upgrade the country’s water infrastructure.

Utilities and services

Councils are responsible for a wide range of utilities and services that we all rely on, from rubbish and recycling to street cleaning. Councils are currently also responsible for managing waste water, storm water and drinking water infrastructure – the ‘Three Waters’. But that may be about to change, with central government seeking to shift the delivery of Three Waters services to four new larger entities, which could borrow enough to upgrade the country’s water infrastructure.

  • Street cleaning focuses on keeping kerbs and drains free of rubbish, leaves, paper and dirt. Business owners need to keep clean frontal areas.

    All dogs should be kept on a leash and restricted from going into wrong areas. Dog collars and chips are necessary to keep the public safe.

    Rubbish and recycling, separating plastics bottles and paper from biodegradable material while recycling goods that can be reused again helps.

  • Work with central and regional government to ensure water infrastructure is resilient and effective.

    Collaborate with communities to develop waste reduction and clean-up programmes.

    Work with communities and corporate sponsors to trial community garden projects.

  • Continue to fight Three Waters. Oppose the theft of ratepayer assets and protect families and business from increased costs.

    Focus on rubbish collection in public spaces. Many publicly used bins are left to overflow or don't exist where there is a need.

    Review dog licensing fees. Currently responsible owners subsidise the bad ones.

  • Decrease the fees for utilities and services.

  • Ensure that our water infrastructure are well maintained and can support our current growth.

    Continue to work alongside key partners to ensure our water and waterways meet our obligations of Kaitiakitanga.

  • Tailor the options for rubbish and recycling based on the suburb.

    Invest in infrastructure to ensure we keep Three Waters managed locally.

  • Promote use of tanks to store rainwater for gardens in summer.

    Provide more education around recycling and the use of the food bins.

  • Incentivise all residents to use our full rubbish and recycling at the kerb service.

    Require rainwater and greywater systems be installed on all new housing developments.

    Educate residents on water conservation and provide funding and finance schemes to support at home water collection systems.

  • Increase community composting initiatives to reduce organic waste to landfill.

    Support the development of water infrastructure, in consideration of changing climate, so that it meets the needs of future generations.

    Support the development of rain gardens, constructed wetlands and stormwater best practice management policies for improved water quality.

  • Promote continual improvement and best practice with waste management.

    Promote Three Waters innovative design through 'think local' solutions.

    Examine and improve the current street cleaning process.

  • Develop a clean street campaign – encouraging residents to work together to help create clean, safe, and attractive neighbourhoods.

    No to Three Waters in its current form.

  • Freeze rates to reduce pressure on people as everything has been going up – cost of living and food has gone up.

  • Lobby central government to review its Three Waters policy. The Auditor General has highlighted a number of issues that need to be resolved.

    Upgrade (where needed) and maintain our water infrastructure to ensure it is fit for current needs and future growth.

    Educate residents about the stormwater system to help reduce contaminants going into the Waikato River.

  • Street cleaning focuses on keeping kerbs and drains free of rubbish, leaves, paper and dirt. Business owners need to keep clean frontal areas.

    All dogs should be kept on a leash and restricted from going into wrong areas. Dog collars and chips are necessary to keep the public safe.

    Rubbish and recycling, separating plastics bottles and paper from biodegradable material while recycling goods that can be reused again helps.

  • Work with central and regional government to ensure water infrastructure is resilient and effective.

    Collaborate with communities to develop waste reduction and clean-up programmes.

    Work with communities and corporate sponsors to trial community garden projects.

  • Continue to fight Three Waters. Oppose the theft of ratepayer assets and protect families and business from increased costs.

    Focus on rubbish collection in public spaces. Many publicly used bins are left to overflow or don't exist where there is a need.

    Review dog licensing fees. Currently responsible owners subsidise the bad ones.

  • Decrease the fees for utilities and services.

  • Ensure that our water infrastructure are well maintained and can support our current growth.

    Continue to work alongside key partners to ensure our water and waterways meet our obligations of Kaitiakitanga.

  • Tailor the options for rubbish and recycling based on the suburb.

    Invest in infrastructure to ensure we keep Three Waters managed locally.

  • Promote use of tanks to store rainwater for gardens in summer.

    Provide more education around recycling and the use of the food bins.

  • Incentivise all residents to use our full rubbish and recycling at the kerb service.

    Require rainwater and greywater systems be installed on all new housing developments.

    Educate residents on water conservation and provide funding and finance schemes to support at home water collection systems.

  • Increase community composting initiatives to reduce organic waste to landfill.

    Support the development of water infrastructure, in consideration of changing climate, so that it meets the needs of future generations.

    Support the development of rain gardens, constructed wetlands and stormwater best practice management policies for improved water quality.

  • Promote continual improvement and best practice with waste management.

    Promote Three Waters innovative design through 'think local' solutions.

    Examine and improve the current street cleaning process.

  • Develop a clean street campaign – encouraging residents to work together to help create clean, safe, and attractive neighbourhoods.

    No to Three Waters in its current form.

  • Freeze rates to reduce pressure on people as everything has been going up – cost of living and food has gone up.

  • Lobby central government to review its Three Waters policy. The Auditor General has highlighted a number of issues that need to be resolved.

    Upgrade (where needed) and maintain our water infrastructure to ensure it is fit for current needs and future growth.

    Educate residents about the stormwater system to help reduce contaminants going into the Waikato River.